Best Ground Blinds For Bow Hunting

Hunting with a bow connects hunters to the long history of mankind, and to nature itself, in a very primal way. 

It’s also a great way to hone your skills, your aim, your patience, and your instincts in the wild.

You get a better opportunity to do all of this from a ground blind, which puts you right in the environment of your prey, and challenges you to exist among the creatures whose every instinct is to evade the predator.

But if you’re going to hunt with a bow, which are the best ground blinds for your specific needs? 

Here, we aim to answer that question and give you the best bow hunts of your life.

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Best Ground Blinds For Bow Hunting - Comparison Table

Best Ground Blinds For Bow Hunting - Reviews

The Big Cat 350 has a center height of 80 inches (6 feet 8 inches). That means you can shoot standing up, and shoot straight, as you would on a target range. 

That makes for a more natural reflection of your skill with a bow than blinds that don’t let you stand to shoot.

The windows of the Big Cat 350 are all zipperless, meaning you won’t spook the prey as you adjust them for more shooting options.

And with the extra space you get in the Big Cat (with its 60 x 70 inch floorplan), once the animals have grown comfortable with the blind in their environment, there’s nothing to stop you inviting a hunting buddy along, or bringing multiple bows and challenging yourself to a spree-hunt.

The Big Cat 350 weighs only 19 pounds, so it’s easy to carry. That means you can afford to bring more bows and broadheads into the wild and extend your bow hunt. 

The Big Cat comes in a range of camo options, allowing you to choose it for a number of different environments, and to hunt a wide range of animals.

There are lots of good options for bow hunters on the ground blind market, but by virtue of its center height and its zipperless windows, the Big Cat 350 sets itself apart from the crowd.

Pros

  • Size – comfortably bring a hunting party, or a lot of additional hunting kit
  • Center height – shoot most bows while standing normally
  •  Zipperless windows allow for a range of shooting options
  • Available in several camo varieties, increasing usefulness on different hunts
  • Lightweight, easy to transport

Cons

  • Size arguably lessens the sense of getting back to nature
  • Some users claim the thin material tears too easily

The Ameristep Care Taker blind doesn’t let you shoot from a standing position unless you or your bow are under 66 inches (5 feet 6 inches), but it does have other advantages that push it up our list.

At just 16.75 pounds, it’s one of the lightest ground blinds of its size, which means you don’t need to think twice – just pick it up and go.

Along with its light travelling weight, users say the Care Taker is quick and easy to set up and take down, for an easier time in the wild than some more rugged blinds allow.

The windows in the Care Taker give you a 360-degree shooting option, and come with shoot-through mesh. That means you won’t be noticed until you take the first of your shots.

The Care Taker is on the lower end of the price spectrum, which has helped Ameristep appeal to a lot of hunters, and many of them use it regularly for their bow hunts.

That said, low price comes with compromises you won’t find at the higher end of the spectrum.

The Care Taker comes with Velcro fastenings, which can be intrusive in the wild, the sound alerting potential prey to the presence of hunters.

Added to which, there’s no way to strap foliage to this blind to help it blend into its environment. While its Realtree edge camo is effective, without the ability to add foliage and depth, that means it’s only as good as 2D painted camo can be.

That said, hunters – and especially bow hunters – are reporting great results with the Care Taker, both for comfort, usually shooting from a chair within the blind.

Pros

  • Good camo means animals rarely notice the blind
  • Easy set up and take down due to the spider hub frame
  • Shoot-through mesh windows
  • Weather resistant in most environments

Cons

  • Velcro fastenings make distracting noises and can warn away prey
  • No option to shoot standing up for hunters over 5 feet 6
  • Can’t add depth to the camo

The Primos Double Bull Deluxe has to be among the easiest blinds on the market to put up and take down. In fact, it takes under a minute to put the Primos blind up, due to the Double Bull system.

Unlike the Care Taker, this blind is entirely zipper and Velcro-free. It also has a center height of 70 inches (5 feet 10 inches), so depending on your bow size, you could potentially hunt from a standing position in the Double Bull.

The windows in the Double Bull create a 180-degree effective shooting area, which means you can take your time to pick the animals you especially want to target.

One of the best features on the Double Bull Deluxe Ground Blind though, and one that pushes it up our list, is its Truth camo, which many hunters report being so effective, animals actually come all the way up to the blind. 

That means the Double Bull Deluxe is as close as a bow hunter would ever want to come to shooting fish in a camouflaged barrel.

With reported results like that, you might expect the Double Bull Deluxe to be our top pick. It’s important to note that the Double Bull Deluxe is significantly more expensive than our leading choices. It’s also among the heaviest blinds on our list, weighing in at a hefty 27 pounds. 

That can dissuade some hunters from taking it into the wild every time they hunt, and helps some of the lighter blinds score more highly than the Double Bull Deluxe. Users also report some issues with the Primos blind in terms of transportation – while it goes up and comes down with ease, it’s sometimes awkward to fit into its carrying case, and the straps and buckles it uses in place of the cheaper blinds’ Velcro and zippers can be a pain to pack away.

So while the Double Bull is a sturdy blind with a build quality that justifies its higher price tag, the question is whether you want to pay Double Bull money for a blind that’s much heavier than others and is difficult to pack away at the end of a long hunt. 

The camo might be impressive and the windows offer a great bow hunting opportunity, but the logistics of the Double Bull might put off some bow hunters who want to travel light.

Pros

  • Easy to set up and take down
  • Zipper and Velcro-free
  • Users claim the camo is among the best they’ve experienced
  • Warranty in case of mishaps with the blind

Cons

  • Heavy blind compared to many
  • Complicated to pack away
  • Price

The Tangkula Pop Up Ground Blind is a sneaky addition to our list.

It’s by no means a dedicated hunting blind, and can work as a hiking tent out of season, so you get two uses out of the same pop up here.

It’s designed to work on hunting trips though, with weatherproofing that means it can hold its own even in more challenging conditions.

Coated in polyurethane, it’s intended for long term use, and is surprisingly spacious, with some users claiming you can fit a party of three comfortably into the Tangkula. We wouldn’t recommend you try this though – the Tangkula’s more of a one-person unit if you want to use it comfortably over the course of a hunt. Two if you’re very friendly.

One of the points that pushes the Tangkula onto our list is its lightweight construction – the shell weighs only 9 pounds. The same weight as a watermelon. So you get to choose what would be more use to you on a hunt in the wild. Feel free to take a watermelon – we’ll watch you eat it in the rain and the mud from inside our snug Tangkula blind.

It’s not all fun and games with the Tangkula though – if it were, the blind would have made it higher up our list. The size of the blind means you’re reduced to taking a knee in the Tangkula, giving bow archers little choice on their aiming or firing positions.

The Tangkula then is a useful lightweight option for bow archers who don’t want to pay out for the bigger, more expensive units and who aren’t put off by a little discomfort or the prospect of honing their shooting from a kneeling position.

Pros

  • High quality construction
  • Lightweight
  • Low price
  • Easy to set up
  • Multi-function - works as a hiking tent too

Cons

  • Small
  • Bow archers have little option but to fire from a kneeling position
  • Some users report the camo fades easily

The Barronett GR351BT Grounder shares a lot of qualities with the list-leading Big Cat, and gives bow hunters similar benefits.

That includes the sense of size and the space to shoot standing up. The center height is 80 inches, or 6 feet 8 inches, so with the Grounder, many bow hunters will be able to stand and shoot as normal.

The Grounder weighs in at just 16 pounds too (a melon and a half), so it’s easy to carry into the wild.

As with the Big Cat, you get shoot-through windows on the Grounder. As a way of keeping the element of surprise in a hunt until the very last moment, they can’t be beaten.

The windows can be adjusted into different configurations for a range of viewing and shooting options too.

Be aware though – the windows on the Grounder are zippered, meaning to adjust them, you have to risk making an unnatural noise in the animals’ environment, so extreme care needs to be taken to avoid spooking the prey if you’re going to adjust the windows mid-hunt.

The Grounder sells for a similar price to the Big Cat, with similar dimensions, which means it offers bow hunters very similar attractions. But where the Big Cat’s windows are zipperless, the Grounder brings the zipper issue front and center. Where possible, go for the Big Cat and its zipperless windows. 

The Grounder’s a good all-round alternative if you need one, but once the hunt has begun, always go with the shoot-through option rather than altering the windows by zipper.

Pros

  • Easy to set up
  • Impressive floorplan
  • Height allows many bow hunters to shoot in their upright stance for greater familiarity and effectiveness
  • Relatively lightweight for the floorplan

Cons

  • Zippers on windows can cause noise that distracts prey if used during hunt
  • Size could take away from the ‘back to nature’ feeling of a bow hunt

Best Ground Blinds For Bow Hunting - Buyers Guide

Bow hunting is a way of taking the hunt ‘back to nature’ because it focuses on the connection between the hunter and the prey.

That said, a ground blind can help get the hunter closer to the prey for longer, if you pick the right one. 

Which blind is right for you though?

What’s more important to you? Space or solitude? 

The ease of the shoot, a bigger hunting party or honing your skills by having to shoot from some other position than full standing? The answer to questions like these will give you your direction – whether you want to pay out for the bigger, more accommodating blinds or whether you’d actually be happier in a cheaper, smaller solo blind. 

We’ve got the best of both ends of the spectrum on our list, to give you a helping hand either way. But ask yourselves what part of your bow hunting experience a ground blind could improve for you, and use the answer to guide your buying.

How comfortable do you want to be when out on a bow hunt? It’s about getting back to nature, certainly, but not necessarily about letting nature get in to you. 

Be sure you get a weatherproof blind or you’ll get a rapid lesson in why early hunters found themselves caves to go home to.

A bow hunt is relatively equipment-lite. How much blind-weight are you prepared to carry into your hunting ground and back? 

How much time do you want to spend setting up and breaking down your hide? If you want to spend your weekends building things, go to IKEA. If you want to bow hunt, get a blind that’s easy to set up and break down, and that doesn’t bend your backbone on the way.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use a ground blind for bow hunting?

You can, but be aware that blinds that let you shoot standing up are more expensive because of the necessary height. You can use smaller ground blinds with a chair, or even take an individual-size blind, but that will limit the shots you can take, and the ways you can take them.

Doesn’t a ground blind go against the spirit of bow hunting?

Only if you carved your own bow straight out of a tree. If you own a modern, manufactured bow, a ground blind is just an extension of the principle – you’re buying something to make your hunt more comfortable and more effective. You’re still relying on the ancient principles of archery to bag your kills. 

A ground blind is no different to our ancestors smearing themselves with mud and wearing leaves to get closer to their prey. It’s a tool that makes our hunting more effective.

How much should I spend on a ground blind for bow hunting?

That’s up to you and your bank account. How much will a blind add to your hunt? It’ll keep you drier and warmer than you’d otherwise be, meaning longer hunts, and it keeps you concealed among the prey for long periods, meaning more effective hunting. How much is that worth to you? And how much money can you spare to meet that need?

Can I use a blind that’s designed for gun hunters?

You can use a handful of leaves if you really want to. Yes, you can use blinds that are designed for gun hunters. But there are some blinds that take the special requirements of bow hunters into account, for instance by adding shoot-through mesh. 

And once you’re in a blind, you might as well get one that takes as much notice of your particular needs as possible.

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